Shorecrest Preparatory School Blog

Kate Fierce

Kate Fierce is the school counselor in the Lower and Middle Schools at Shorecrest Preparatory School. Ms. Fierce received an B.A. in Psychology from Cornell University and a M.S.Ed in Psychological Services from the University of Pennsylvania. She spent 7 years as an elementary school counselor at New Eagle Elementary School in Wayne, PA, a blue-ribbon-awarded school in the nationally ranked and recognized Tredyffrin-Easttown School District. Ms. Fierce joined the Shorecrest faculty in 2012.

Recent Posts

Techniques to Ease the Back to School Jitters

Posted by Kate Fierce on Jul 31, 2017 8:00:00 AM

Every year, I hear from many families about the difficulties they and their children are having adjusting to going back to school. It’s quite common for students to feel apprehensive about the increased expectations in a new grade level, to worry about friends and fitting in, to be disappointed by the teacher they have or by the lack of close friends in their classrooms. We all want to see that our children and students are happy and confident, but these fears and disappointments are not something detrimental to their emotional health. Quite the opposite!

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Topics: Social-Emotional Development

Parenting and Overindulging Children

Posted by Kate Fierce on Nov 7, 2016 8:00:00 AM

A blog inspired by the book "The Blessing of a Skinned Knee" by Dr. Wendy Mogel.
 
“I know why this is hard for me. My mom and dad always made me feel like I was the best: the most beautiful, the smartest, the most charming. And mostly I’ve done well in everything. But now I’m finding out that I’m not that unusual. Maybe I’m good enough, but I don’t know anymore.”
 
Parenting is, by its very nature, a giving job. Mothers, fathers, and caregivers often give all of themselves to their children – mentally, physically, and emotionally. While there is no such thing as loving a child too much, there is such a thing as giving, and giving in, too much. Despite a parent’s loving, best intentions, showering children with abundance can often become more than they can handle. Overindulgence can be defined as giving too much of anything to a child such that his or her learning and development is slowed. When we give children everything, or do everything for them, we deprive them of experiences necessary for the development of basic skills, confidence, and self-esteem.

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Topics: Parenting

The Blessing of Longing

Posted by Kate Fierce on Oct 31, 2016 8:00:00 AM

Children (and adults) often confuse what they want with what they need. This is increasingly true these days, as we live in a culture that sells us all of our hearts’ desires. Change your outlook with a new outfit! Become a new person in a new automobile! Be the coolest kid on the block with the latest video gaming system! Get through a tough day with “retail therapy” or loads of comfort food! These powerful messages contribute to a lack of gratitude for what we have, a desire for more than we need, and an inability to recognize our blessings.


If it is tempting for adults to be consumed by desire for what they do not have, think how much more tempting it is for children, who have not yet mastered self-control or delayed gratification! In The Blessing of a Skinned Knee, Dr. Wendy Mogel asserts that, “longing is a blessing, because children who get most of their desires satisfied right away don’t have a chance to appreciate what they’ve already got.”

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Topics: Parenting

The Blessing of a Skinned Knee

Posted by Kate Fierce on Oct 24, 2016 8:00:00 AM

Of the many people who enter my office or seek my support over the course of a school year, a significant portion are parents who are feeling anxious and unsuccessful with their children. Despite their efforts to encourage their children to express their feelings, to provide for their wants and needs abundantly, and to educate them on the reasons for household rules, these parents often feel that they are losing control. These are good parents, and yet conflict is the norm in the home. The parents see their children as angry and demanding, despite the parents’ efforts to provide tons of attention and entertainment for them.
 
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Topics: Parenting

When Your Child is Being the Bully

Posted by Kate Fierce on Oct 17, 2016 8:00:00 AM

It’s the news that no parent wants to hear. Your child has been engaging in bullying behavior. It is difficult for any parent to accept that their loving child is being less than kind to others. It’s important to remember at times like these that children who demonstrate bullying behavior are not terrible people with uncertain futures. Rather they are children, growing and learning, who will occasionally make bad choices and face unpleasant consequences. Your reaction to the situation will, to great degree, help determine whether or not this becomes a learning experience that prompts behavior change.

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Topics: Social-Emotional Development